Sunday, 25 June 2017

Review: The Other Half of Happiness by Ayisha Malik

The Other Half of Happiness by Ayisha MalikThe Other Half of Happiness by Ayisha Malik (Bought) - WARNING! I cannot review this book without spoiling the others in the series. Read no further if you're planning on reading this series and don't want it spoilt for you.

Sofia Khan is just married. But no-one told her life was going to be this way . . .

Her living situation is in dire straits, her husband Conall is distant, and his annoyingly attractive colleague is ringing all sorts of alarm bells.

When her mother forces them into a belated wedding ceremony (elopement: you can run, but you can't hide), Sofia wonders if it might be a chance to bring them together. But when it forces Conall to confess his darkest secret, it might just tear them apart.
From Goodreads.

Saturday, 24 June 2017

Review: If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan

If You Could Be Mine by Sara FarizanIf You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan - In this stunning debut, a young Iranian American writer pulls back the curtain on one of the most hidden corners of a much-talked-about culture.

Seventeen-year-old Sahar has been in love with her best friend, Nasrin, since they were six. They’ve shared stolen kisses and romantic promises. But Iran is a dangerous place for two girls in love—Sahar and Nasrin could be beaten, imprisoned, even executed if their relationship came to light.

So they carry on in secret—until Nasrin’s parents announce that they’ve arranged for her marriage. Nasrin tries to persuade Sahar that they can go on as they have been, only now with new comforts provided by the decent, well-to-do doctor Nasrin will marry. But Sahar dreams of loving Nasrin exclusively—and openly.

Then Sahar discovers what seems like the perfect solution. In Iran, homosexuality may be a crime, but to be a man trapped in a woman’s body is seen as nature’s mistake, and sex reassignment is legal and accessible. As a man, Sahar could be the one to marry Nasrin. Sahar will never be able to love the one she wants, in the body she wants to be loved in, without risking her life. Is saving her love worth sacrificing her true self?
From Goodreads.

Trigger warning: This book contains - and my review discusses - homophobia.

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Review: salt. by Nayyirah Waheed

salt. by Nayyirah Waheedsalt. by Nayyirah Waheed (Bought) - Salt is a journey through warmth and sharpness. This collection of poetry explores the realities of multiple identities, language, diasporic life & pain, the self, community, healing, celebration, and love. From Goodreads.

Review: Out of Heart by Irfan Master

Out of Heart by Irfan MasterOut of Heart by Irfan Master (eProof) - Donating your heart is the most precious gift of all.

Adam is a teenage boy who lives with his mum and younger sister. His dad has left them although lives close by. His sister no longer speaks. His mum works two jobs. Adam feels the weight of the world upon his shoulders.

Then his grandfather dies and in doing so he donates a very precious gift - his heart.

William is the recipient of Adam's grandfather's heart. He has no family and feels rootless and alone. In fact, he feels no particular reason to live. And then he meets Adam's family.

William has received much, but it appears that he has much to offer Adam and his family too.

A powerful tale of love and strength in adversity.
From Goodreads.

Sunday, 18 June 2017

Review: The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-Fattah

The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-FattahThe Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-Fattah (review copy) - Michael is drawn to his new classmate Mina, but they're on opposite sides of an issue that's tearing their town apart. His parents are part of an anti-immigration group, while her family have fled their besieged home in Afghanistan. As tensions rise, lines are drawn and both must decide what they want their world to look like, no matter the cost. From Goodreads.

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Review: Written in the Stars by Aisha Saeed

Written in the Stars by Aisha SaeedWritten in the Stars by Aisha Saeed (Bought) - Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late. From Goodreads.

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Review: Sofia Khan is Not Obliged by Ayisha Malik

Sofia Khan is Not Obliged by Ayisha MalikSofia Khan is Not Obliged by Ayisha Malik (Bought) - "Brilliant idea! Excellent! Muslim dating? Well, I had no idea you were allowed to date." Then he leaned towards me and looked at me sympathetically. "Are your parents quite disappointed?"

Unlucky in love once again after her possible-marriage-partner-to-be proves a little too close to his parents, Sofia Khan is ready to renounce men for good. Or at least she was, until her boss persuades her to write a tell-all expose about the Muslim dating scene.

As her woes become her work, Sofia must lean on the support of her brilliant friends, baffled colleagues and baffling parents as she goes in search of stories for her book. In amongst the marriage-crazy relatives, racist tube passengers and decidedly odd online daters, could there be a a lingering possibility that she might just be falling in love...?
From Goodreads.